Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online:

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
ORIGINAL RESEARCH Table of Contents   
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 32  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 354-361
Comparative evaluation of audio-visual and verbal education method on OHRQoL, dental anxiety, dental neglect of diabetes mellitus patients attending a teaching hospital in India


1 Department of Public Health Dentistry, Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Department of Public Health Dentistry, R Ahmad Dental College, Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ankita Jain
Department of Public Health Dentistry, Teerthanker Mahaveer Dental College and Research Centre, Moradabad, Uttar Pradesh
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.ijdr_822_21

Rights and Permissions

Aim: The aim of this study was to compare audio-visual and verbal education on oral health related quality of life, dental anxiety and dental neglect, on diabetes mellitus patients attending Teerthanker Mahaveer Hospital, Moradabad. Materials and Method: The current longitudinal interventional study was conducted to check the efficiency of audio-visual and verbal education on OHRQoL, Dental anxiety and dental neglect, on diabetes mellitus patients attending Teerthanker Mahaveer Hospital, Moradabad, U.P., India. A 14-item questionnaire, OHIP-14, with emphasis on seven proportions of impact was used to collect information on OHRQoL. Corah Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS) will be used to collect data on Dental Anxiety. A prevalidated revised proforma of Dental Neglect Scale (DNS) was used to gather information on Dental Neglect. The questionnaire was a six-question instrument related to dental problems. After collecting the initial baseline data, the sample was divided into two groups: verbal education group (n = 1030) and audio-visual education group (n = 1030). Then oral health education (OHE) was provided verbally to Group I patients and OHE with audio-visual aids was given to Group II patients visiting Teerthanker Mahaveer Hospital. OHE was repeated every 2 months. At every 6, 12 and 18 months, questionnaire was repeated to evaluate the effectiveness of OHE. Inspection will be conducted under natural daylight in hospital premises. To avoid the disruption while conducting the examination, adequate supply of instruments was taken. Instruments were sterilized by autoclaving in the college. Results: A total of 1926 patients attended all the follow-up and review examinations. Subject dropout for Group I was 2% with 1009 at 6th month; 3% with 978 at 12th month and 1% with 967 at 18th month. Subject dropout rate for Group II was 3% with 999 at 6th month; 0% with 999 at 12th month and 4% with 959 at 18th month. The difference of subject dropout among the groups was not statistically significant (P = 0.23). Group mean total OHIP-14 score after 18 months was recorded as 15.36 ± 8.61, whereas in Audio-visual education group mean total OHIP-14 score after 18 months was recorded as 14.42 ± 7.59. At the end of study mean DAS score for DAS ≥15 (severe anxiety) was found to be 1.95 ± 2.18 in verbal education group, whereas in audio-visual education group mean DAS score for DAS ≥15 (severe anxiety) was found to be 2.24 ± 1.98. At the end of the study mean DN score for DNS ≥15 (severe Dental Neglect) was found to be 3.54 ± 2.63 in verbal education group, whereas audiovisual education group mean DN score for DNS ≥15 (severe Dental Neglect) was found to be 2.59 ± 2.75. Conclusion: The quality of life is a factor that can be considerably affected by oral health, which in turn reflects the general health of an individual. The main part of oral disease prevention is done by use of personal oral hygiene measures and maintaining oral hygiene. It is the duty of dental professionals to motivate, show and instruct patients to maintain appropriate oral health and oral hygiene. The study concludes that the program of this kind may be beneficial in improving many dimensions of dental health of an individual that includes physical health, emotional well-being, OHRQoL, inter-personal relationship and the fear related to dental treatment.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 
 Similar in PUBMED
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed878    
    Printed50    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded34    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal