Indian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental ResearchIndian Journal of Dental Research
HOME | ABOUT US | EDITORIAL BOARD | AHEAD OF PRINT | CURRENT ISSUE | ARCHIVES | INSTRUCTIONS | SUBSCRIBE | ADVERTISE | CONTACT
Indian Journal of Dental Research   Login   |  Users online:

Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size         

 


 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 14-17
Root canal morphology of primary molars – A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) study


1 Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Florida, USA
2 Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Maulana Azad Institute of Dental Sciences, New Delhi, India
3 Division of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry, Centre for Dental Education and Research (CDER), All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Jatinder K Dhillon
Department of Pediatric Dentistry, College of Dental Medicine, Nova Southeastern University, Florida
USA
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ijdr.IJDR_748_20

Rights and Permissions

Objectives: To evaluate the root and canal morphology of primary maxillary and mandibular molars in an Indian population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed, where CBCT scans of children less than 10 years of age taken for valid diagnostic purposes previously were considered and images were analyzed. The number of roots, root canals, and variations in morphology were recorded. Left–right symmetry was also noted. Results: A total of 433 deciduous maxillary and mandibular primary molars were studied. It was observed that two separate roots with three separate canals were common in primary mandibular first molars, whereas two separate roots with two canals in each root were common in mandibular second primary molars. In primary maxillary molars, three separate roots with one canal each were the most common. Maxillary first molars (17.21%) and 17.35% second molars had fused distobuccal and palatal roots. It was observed that primary maxillary molars showed more left–right symmetry (86.7% in first molars and 82.7% in second molars) compared to primary mandibular molars (54.05% in first molars and 68% in second molars). Conclusions: It was concluded that in both primary maxillary first and second molars, three separate roots, a mesiobuccal root, a distobuccal root, and a palatal root with one canal in each root, were the most common. Two separate roots with three separate canals were the most common in primary mandibular first molars, whereas two separate roots with two canals each in both roots were more common in mandibular second primary molars.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article

 
 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
  Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
  Reader Comments
  Email Alert *
  Add to My List *
 
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1454    
    Printed78    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded47    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal